How To Wear Oversized Sweaters/Jumpers

Our versatile range of mens jumpers and sweaters gives you a great choice of styles, fabrics and colours. From heavy‑duty pure wool knits to see you through cold winter days, to lightweight and breathable linen and silk blends for warm weather, rely on our jumpers and sweaters all year round.

The holes itself is 2 inches across.

Browse some of our finest jumpers and sweaters at great low prices in this WoolOvers sale. Explore our full range of all-natural yarns, including Lambswool, Cotton, Merino, Cashmere, and various blends, finding both men's and women's pieces in smart and casual styles.
Discover women's jumpers & cardigans at ASOS. Shop from a range of jumpers, cardigans and sweaters available from ASOS.
the #wardrobebuilder project - Jumpers and Sweaters So, here is the first wardrobe essential for the handmade wardrobe- Jumpers and Sweaters. What else could we all be looking to make in the middle of winter, after all those mince pies?
After a very long wait, we finally have the pattern available as a download, thanks to the wonderful tech editing talents of Clare from Yarn and Pointy Sticks and Bronagh (laPurplePenguin).). I’m sure you’ll find it much easier to read than from the photographs of the original pattern in the magazine (shown below)!
Discover Damart's women's jumpers & ladies sweaters perfect for staying warm in winter. Includes chunky knits & cotton sweaters, available in a range of colours.
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Swaledale Woollens was founded in Muker, North Yorkshire over 30 years ago by villagers reviving the old cottage industry of knitting. Swaledale Woollens is now owned and run by Kathleen Hird who carries on using local Swaledale and Wensleydale wool for the knitwear.

The disparity between what the knitters are paid and what the perceived value to a Harrod's customers as above and the luxury goods marketplace have both done equal measure of creating an attitude of ambivalence within Shetland toward the continuation of its iconic legacy.

Yet, walk into Harvey Nichols Scotland's flagship luxury goods purveyor and a machine-made, in Italy, merino wool Fair Isle inspired pullover i. What's equally important is that the purchase of Mr. McQueen's, or any other label, of 'Fair Isle style' fails to provide any economic benefit to Shetland. Both circumstances are equally abhorrent.

As a result of the endemic poor compensation, the native population undervaluing their most globally recognised product and upscale clothing designers being inspired but not ethically compelled to source locally, instead of hundreds of legacy knitters of multiple generations continuing this iconic art form perhaps two hundred remain.

In totality this is exactly the reverse of how luxury goods houses create demand. Saville Row tailors and Bond Street cobblers, despite struggles, continue because their customers wait for perfection to be created for them and pay dearly for the privilege of ownership. If authentic hand-knit Fair Isle was to have a chance to survive then waiting, as a connoisseur of an Hermès of Paris crocodile Kelly handbag waits, would need to be part of the business model. To bring cachet to Fair Isle knitwear demands that you are one of a finite number of people on a global basis each year who might own a bespoke effort of a Shetland hand-knitter and subsequently wait and pay accordingly.

The bulk of that price, rightfully, belongs to the knitter who because of decades of knitting has honed her craft to an art form worthy of reverence. Of course with any luxury good there will be imitations. Unlike Harris Tweed which enjoys a certification process and an Act of Parliament to define it, Fair Isle Knitwear has become a generic term used by designer and High Street alike to sell ridiculously expensive to pathetically cheap knock-offs.

It is a type of girl's dress, a top, with attached shorts basically. Google will be happy to show you images. It has a kind of "little girl" sense to it kind of like pinafore, however, for sure adult women wear them too. In the UK this is the same as a jumper, a garment you wear over your shirt, with no buttons, and is pulled over your head. In the US this is a similar item, however, a cardigan with buttons can also be called a sweater in the US.

So in the UK it all means pretty much the same, however there are considerable semantic variations in the US. This is just based on my personal observation having lived in both countries.

I am sure there are lots of subtle regional variations. For example, in the UK the further north you go, the more likely you are to use jumper instead of sweater, and vice versa. Though pullover is pretty universal. In Chile, because of the influence of many immigrants from Britain, a sweater is ' una chompa ' — isn't that neat? Pullover is absolutely part of the wardrobe here! But it needn't be wooly — it can be made of fleece synthetic or a lightweight cotton-jersey knit type thing with long sleeves.

Has to pull over the head versus zipping or buttoning up the front. Sweater — any knitted thing for the top of your body. Short sleeves, long sleeves, button front, pullover, hooded, etc. You specify the details. Sweater-vest, hooded sweater, turtleneck sweater, etc. Jumper — this is actually a dress no shorts attached—that is a jumpsuit as clarified above with no sleeves or collar; it is worn over a blouse or lightweight 'pullover' as we see in Catholic school uniforms here.

The word jumper is not used for that particular garment in American English, so there's one difference for you. As for pullover , I suppose that would be used to refer only to the subset of sweaters that one puts on by pulling them over one's head, which would exclude things like cardigans and some sweater vests. In the UK jumper, sweater and pullover are different names for exactly the same thing.

A cardigan has buttons. As others have said, all three mean the same thing in British English. What nobody else has mentioned yet is that we might also call such a garment a jersey. Ireland is the same as BrE but we also have a gansey. Ganseys originated in Guernesy, jerseys in Jersey. A gansey-load of something is quite a lot, the amount you could carry in your gansey.

My daughter and I worked on a fantastic definition of "jumper" together, and it didn't make it to a post because I hadn't logged in first.

Here's my take on my own:. A jumper is an item of clothing that essentially provides, all in one piece, a skirt and a bodice. It is sleeveless and, by definition, is meant to be worn over a blouse or turtleneck. The jumper can hang from the shoulders to the hemline OR it can have a waistband. One can pull the jumper over one's head or, in the case of my daughter's jumper, step into it - this depends largely on the neckline.

What nobody else has mentioned yet is that we might also call such a garment a jersey. Ireland is the same as BrE but we also have a gansey. Ganseys originated in Guernesy, jerseys in Jersey. A gansey-load of something is quite a lot, the amount you could carry in your gansey. My daughter and I worked on a fantastic definition of "jumper" together, and it didn't make it to a post because I hadn't logged in first.

Here's my take on my own:. A jumper is an item of clothing that essentially provides, all in one piece, a skirt and a bodice. It is sleeveless and, by definition, is meant to be worn over a blouse or turtleneck. The jumper can hang from the shoulders to the hemline OR it can have a waistband. One can pull the jumper over one's head or, in the case of my daughter's jumper, step into it - this depends largely on the neckline. They can go down the back or on the side. A jumper is closed all the way around - since I just read this evening that a pinafore my guess for what the British would call our jumper is not generally closed in the back although it could have apron-string ties to keep it in place - thank you, Wikipedia.

My daughter's jumper has a yoke-style top - that is it has a fairly open front; it has a waistband with both a zipper and button, on one side, for closure.

The combination of the wide opening down the front and the zipper allows her to step into the garment through the top; the zipper closes up and the button secures the waistband. A jumper is, in my opinion, worn more often by girls than by grown women.

At my daughter's school, their skirts of their jumpers are to be "mid-knee" length; during the course of the year, they grow and the skirts get relatively shorter. A pullover would be anything like a sweater or sweatshirt or fleece that goes over your head to go on. It wouldn't have buttons or a zipper except for decoration.

I don't think that I would call any of my clothes a pullover, although I would know what someone means if they used the term. As for sweater, I liked the definition from above: Sweater-vest, Hooded sweater, turtleneck sweater, etc. The extra warmth still holds those fine materials generally trap a lot of heat.

The only exception would be some more decorative sweater made of a light-weight yarn and and open knit for warm-weather wear as I said, an exception. A long-sleeved or short-sleeved knitted garment pulled over the head is called a jersey.

These can be somewhat formal, and are commonly part of school uniforms, or work attire, in winter, because of South Africa's relatively mild climate. Terms like cardigan , and especially, pullover and jumper are rarer, or never used in everyday speech. A more casual, colourful upper garment, often made of synthetic fabrics is called a sweater , or if part of a tracksuit, then a tracksuit top.

According to Wikipedia, these South African "sweaters" are called "sweatshirts" in the rest of the world. Heavier fabric casual sweaters, with or without hoods, are often called jackets. Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site the association bonus does not count.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead? Questions Tags Users Badges Unanswered. What's the difference between a jumper, a pullover, and a sweater?

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Sweater-vest, hooded sweater, turtleneck sweater, etc. Jumper — this is actually a dress (no shorts attached—that is a jumpsuit as clarified above) with no sleeves or collar; it is worn over a blouse or lightweight 'pullover' as we see in Catholic school uniforms here. Jumper vs Sweater Without going into semantics or the origin of the words, it can be said that both jumper and sweater refer to pieces of clothing, preferably warm. Especially a sweater, as the name implies is a woolly garment that is either button less or has buttons and needs to be worn by placing [ ]. Home New In Jumpers & Sweaters Jumpers & Sweaters Welcome to our collection of lovingly designed, carefully made jumpers which are easy to wear. Our % natural yarns and blends feel soft against the skin and are completely breathable for year-round comfort.